architecture portfolio
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Food hub on Danube

 

Student work

Location: Belgrade, Serbia

Year: 2009

 The Food hub project is situated on the bank of the river Danube in a modernist zone of Belgrade, next to an iconic hotel Yugoslavia.

The Food hub project is situated on the bank of the river Danube in a modernist zone of Belgrade, next to an iconic hotel Yugoslavia.

FOOD HUB_elevation 2.jpg
 Transcultural market and restaurant project is an exercise on the notion of transculture and implications that this sociological determinant can have in physical environment. Research relies on writings of philosopher Merab Mamardashvili who defines transculture as transcending the limits of one’s native surroundings and culture and stepping into “no culture” because the limits of any culture are too narrow for the full range of human potentials and human being can exceed all “genetic” definitions.

Transcultural market and restaurant project is an exercise on the notion of transculture and implications that this sociological determinant can have in physical environment. Research relies on writings of philosopher Merab Mamardashvili who defines transculture as transcending the limits of one’s native surroundings and culture and stepping into “no culture” because the limits of any culture are too narrow for the full range of human potentials and human being can exceed all “genetic” definitions.

 In the project, the transcultural potential of users is triggered by food choices that they make (stage one: GREEN MARKET), food processing that they cannot have control of (stage two: KITCHEN), and finally, consumption of food that they’ve chosen  and others have prepared (stage three: RESTAURANT). This process, reflected on the form of the object, symbolically describes how our origins and customs can be deconstructed and how such experiences can and should affect our future choices.

In the project, the transcultural potential of users is triggered by food choices that they make (stage one: GREEN MARKET), food processing that they cannot have control of (stage two: KITCHEN), and finally, consumption of food that they’ve chosen  and others have prepared (stage three: RESTAURANT). This process, reflected on the form of the object, symbolically describes how our origins and customs can be deconstructed and how such experiences can and should affect our future choices.

FOOD HUB_day perspective.jpg
FOOD HUB_night perspective.jpg